Top 10 Places to find your Ideal Workplace:

Finding the right place to work that is a perfect fit for your skills, passions, and culture is a difficult task.

A Quick Note before you starting looking for companies…you must be able to complete the following sentence:
— I solve X pain for Y type of company by doing Z and here are my results —

Once you are able to clearly articulate the pain you solve and the type of organization that is likely to have that pain, you can begin searching for specific companies.

Here are 10 places that you can identify companies that are likely to have the pain that you can solve:

  1. The Business Journals Most metropolitan cities in the US have a Business Journal dedicated to them. This is a great resource to keep your finger on the pulse of your local business market to identify companies that are growing, relocating, moving and shaking. I highly recommend that you get a subscription for your local market now
  2. The Book of Lists: Each year, the Business Journal publishes a “Book of Lists” in it are page after page of different categories of business in your area. Lists include: Fastest Growing Companies Under/Over $50M, Best Places to Work, Largest Private Companies, and many more.
  3. Your friends and colleagues. You have to do more than send out a blast email, “Hey, I’m out of work do you know anyone that’s hiring.” They may be your BFF, but this is not going to help you. You need to be able to give them an idea of what work you moving to so they can help you…BTW if it’s been a while since you’ve touched base, now is a good time to buy them coffee…just be sensitive to their time, they’re busy.
  4. Business Networking events. Keep in mind that most people at business networking events are Business Development (aka sales) people. They’re super friendly, but unless you’re in sales, they are probably not hiring managers. Use the opportunity to learn about the company: What is their culture? What do they sell? What is the value proposition they present to their customers?
  5. Don’t sit at the computer filling out online job applications. This gives you a false sense that you’ve actually done something. Allow yourself no more than 2 or 3 hours a week to find and apply for online jobs.
  6. Did you find a job posted online? Great, now put on your detective hat and learn more about that company and explore other opportunities with them.
  7. Industry and functional associations. HINT Get involved with the associations now and don’t just wait for when you need to find a job.
  8. Private Equity Firms. PE Firms have tight time schedules and are very demanding. If you have the right background and enjoy the pace, there can be some hidden opportunities for you.
  9. Recruiters. Do your homework on some of the Top Recruiting firms in your area and geography. A clear introduction letter outlining the pain you solve and the type of company you’re looking for can go a long way in helping a recruiter connect you with the right opportunity. NOTE: don’t fall into the trap that a recruiter is going to “find you a job.” Their job is to “find multiple qualified candidates for open positions.”
  10. BlueSteps a discreet database hosted by the Association of Executive Search and Leadership Consultants that is visible only to member recruiters. This is the only suggestion that requires a fee. But if you have demonstrated executive leadership and a verifiable salary of $150K or more it may be worth having your profile in this database.
  11. BONUS: Work with a coach like me 8^)
  12. Inc. 5000 list

What do you think? What places have I missed? Leave me a comment.

Husband, father, corporate leader, small business owner. Wherever I've been, and whatever title I've held, I've always focused on the strengths in others to stimulate personal and group excellence. My roles have always been leadership, and I'm at my best when I'm transforming something strong into something superb. Feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn.